Eastbay Astronomical Society
Eightieth Anniversary Dinner
Sunday, March 7, 2004
Astronomy Hall of Chabot Space & Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard, Oakland

PLEASE SUBMIT YOUR RESERVATIONS ON OR BEFORE MARCH 1st SO WE
CAN GET A GOOD ESTIMATE OF HOW MANY PEOPLE
ARE COMING

The doors will open at 5:45 pm, with Dinner at 6:45 pm. Awards presentation, door prizes and lecture about 8:00 p.m.

Speaker: Dr. Phil Plait
"The Bad Astronomer"

Dr. Phil Plait is an astronomer and educator at Sonoma State University, where he develops educational materials based on NASA space science. He is better known as "The Bad Astronomer", debunking myths, misconceptions, and misuses of astronomy. His Bad Astronomy website(http://www.badastronomy.com) is one of the most popular astronomy sites on the web. There he tackles cosmic silliness head-on, ripping apart claims that the Apollo Moon landings were faked, Planet X will kill us all, and that scientists have no sense of humor. Dr. Plait wrote a book titled (surprise!) "Bad Astronomy", and is currently working on a second book, as well as several magazine articles, TV shows, and a way to keep his washing machine from squeaking during the spin cycle.

Title: Seven Ways a Black Hole Can Kill You

Face it: black holes are cool. They are ferocious devourers of matter, energy, and even space itself, and they excite our imagination even as they fill us with dread. Certainly, falling into one would be the last thing you would ever do, but that's not the only way a black hole can kill you. It turns out there are at least seven ways, including ripping you to pieces, irradiating you with X- and gamma rays, alternately compressing and stretching you as they form, and even frying you if you happen to get too near one as it explodes (bet you didn't know they could do that, did you?).

Astronomer Phil Plait (webmaster of Bad Astronomy at www.badastronomy.com) will light-heartedly show you all the nasty and gruesome ways a black hole can ruin your day, and in the process show you what black holes are, how they form, how they can die, and how scientists have figured all this out.

This year’s Helen Pillans Award goes to Mike Reynolds for his strong support of amateur astronomy and insistence on having a place for the Telescope Makers Workshop at the Chabot Space & Science Center.

The dinner will be catered by Harry’s Hofbrau featuring Roast Beef, Turkey, Ham and Spinach Lasagna. This dinner received rave reviews the past eight years.
Cost per person will be $33.00. Mail your checks, payable to the EAS, as soon as possible with this form, or bring it with you to the next meeting, or give it to Carter Roberts at CSSC some Friday evening. Get your reservation in soon to guarantee a seat. We must give the caterer a final count by March 1st.

Questions?
Contact EAS Treasurer Don Stone at
(707) 938-1667
or email him at ddcstone@earthlink.net